About

BACKGROUND

“I worked in advertising & marketing in the heady days of the 1980s, when everyone under 30 was a whiz-kid. It was terrifically exciting; it offered me the chance to do some excellent work for blue-chip clients and to gain broad-based business experience in consumer marketing. At 30, I felt the need to do something with more social value, so I became chief executive of an old-established British charity, the Vegetarian Society of the United Kingdom.  We succeeded in igniting the vegetarian revolution in Britain; before, vegetarianism was considered to be eccentric and weird; now, it’s chic and commonplace. This led directly to writing a book – “Why You Don’t Need Meat” which became a UK best-seller and has been published all round the world.

WRITING

“The Booksellers Association voted it the best promotional campaign of the year, and the reviews were spectacular.  Best of all was the response from readers: I received hundreds of very moving letters. Paul & Linda McCartney got in touch and invited me down to their farm. Linda and I hit it off, and together wecreated “Linda McCartney’s Home Cooking” which we spent the next two years writing. It was a massive bestseller, and Paul then asked me to set up a food company for him. I declined, because I was still in love with writing, and didn’t want to run a business outside of the publishing industry. I did, however, provide advice and consultancy on setting up their food business, which I’m pleased to say has been highly successful. It was a great example of how a best-selling book can be leveraged into an entirely different market. I went on to write or co-write a number of other books, many of which also became bestsellers. I don’t write anymore now: my driving passion is to represent other authors.”

REVIEWS

“Cox’s argument is riveting; his conclusions utterly disturbing.”

…Elle

“By dealing not with opinions, hypotheses or calculated guesses, but in facts, Cox’s book makes for compelling, incisive reading…. Crucial.”

…City Limits

“Peter Cox’s arguments are fascinating”

…The Lancet

“Explores vegetarianism intelligently and persuasively”

…Marie Claire

“Brings together in a readable form much recent research into nutrition and diet. This is a controversial and provocative book but, whatever one’s ultimate conclusions concerning Cox’s views, the arguments cannot be lightly dismissed; neither can they be relegated to the ‘lunatic fringe’ of food faddism.”

…Nursing Times

“With his winning smile and stripy blazer, Peter Cox looks like a daytime TV presenter.”

…The Independent

“Horrifying reading for meat-eaters, but well presented, easy to read and could change your life!”

…19 Magazine

“By the time you have finished reading it you will be ready to take on the meat industry…that is, if its proponents will come out of hiding. At the launch of the book 13 meat and farming magazines were represented-their silence was deafening.”

…Agscene

“Peter Cox is a very convincing man”

…Meat Trades Journal

“He is earnest, funny, very, very persuasive and the master of the controversial, catchy sound bite.”

…Eastern Daily Press

“Cox’s text is a damning indictment of meat-eating in general… I haven’t eaten meat since reading the book…”

…Camden New Journal

“Peter, who first spat out meat at the age of two, has sold more than half a million books – which must, at a conservative estimate, make him a millionaire.”

…Today

“Explosive… If you’ve ever thought twice about the contents of the beefburger you’re eating or felt unease when the latest meat-related disease hogs the headlines – then you should buy this book… One of the most thought-provoking tomes you may read this year… Do yourself a favour and buy this book now.”

“The trouble with Mr. Cox’s book is that, having read it, it’s all or nothing… Pass me the tofu.”

…The Observer

“Linda McCartney thinks Peter Cox is no less than a life-saver. For the meat trade and its propagandists, he must be the most hated man in the world. I find Cox’s book compellingly persuasive… read it and make up your own mind.”

…Newcastle Evening Chronicle

“He is earnest, funny, very, very persuasive and the master of the controversial, catchy sound bite.”

…Eastern Daily Press

“Cox’s text is a damning indictment of meat-eating in general… I haven’t eaten meat since reading the book…”

…Camden New Journal

“Peter, who first spat out meat at the age of two, has sold more than half a million books – which must, at a conservative estimate, make him a millionaire.”

…Today

“Peter Cox is both energetic and amiable, with the kind of charm normally found in the diplomatic service. As he has become our foremost vegetarian ambassador perhaps this is not surprising.”

…Vegetarian Living

“Clean-shaven and besuited, he looks obscenely healthy and demonstrates a surfeit of energy as he fires off one salvo after another in the direction of the abattoirs”

…Daily Telegraph

“Peter Cox is a smartly turned-out former executive with an impressive track record in advertising – an unlikely candidate to be an advocate of an alternative culture. But he is the meat industry’s most effective foe… If Mr. Cox’s past campaigns are anything to go by, his latest assault on meat-eating will have the following consequences: his wife will receive warnings that he is about to be killed and be told how is corpse is about to be jointed; representatives of butchers and farmers will denounce him ‘as an evangelist with few scruples’; and tens of thousands of people will become vegetarian.”

…Independent on Sunday

“He appears to have an identity problem, having at a young age confused himself with plant life…”

…Evening Standard

“Peter Cox is a man with a lot of enemies among butchers but quite a few friends among pop stars… in his impeccable suit and folded overcoat finally dispels the notion that vegetarians spend their days in the organic allotment in dungarees and a CND badge.”

…Yorkshire Post

“For Peter Cox vegetarianism has all the appearance of a particularly austere religious order… Austere men are often dangerous: Cromwell, Robespierre, Mussolini and Hitler, for example… Cox and Hitler share a trait: they both believe the future belongs to vegetarians.”

…Financial Times